Street News

The USPS Will Be Releasing New Stamps In 2016 Commemorating Some Iconic Pick-Up Trucks

 

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© 2016 USPS

 

Later this year, the United States Postal Service is going to be releasing four new Forever stamps depicting some memorable pickup trucks. A release date has not been given yet, but we thought we would share this info so enthusiasts could be on the lookout for these awesome stamps.

Pickup Trucks

Celebrating the rugged and reliable work vehicles that Americans have driven for nearly a century, each of these four new Forever stamps features one of the following iconic models.

  • The strong, sturdy, 1938 International Harvester D-2 had a distinct barrel-shaped grille and its elegant styling mirrored the look of luxury automobiles of the era.
When reproducing, please use the copyright sign (the “c” inside the circle) and 2016 USPS.

© 2016 USPS.

  • The 1948 Ford F-1 included features like the roomy “Million Dollar Cab,” a sharp horizontal five-bar grille and a six cylinder engine.
When reproducing, please use the copyright sign (the “c” inside the circle) and 2016 USPS.

©2016 USPS.

  • The 1953 Chevrolet featured large windshields and provided drivers with excellent visibility, a distinctive curvy grille that bulged in the middle and a six-cylinder engine.
When reproducing, please use the copyright sign (the “c” inside the circle) and 2016 USPS.

© 2016 USPS.

  • The 1965 Ford F-100 had a new grille that featured 18 small rectangular openings. It also featured what Ford dubbed “Twin-I-Beam” independent front suspension.
When reproducing, please use the copyright sign (the “c” inside the circle) and 2016 USPS.

© 2016 USPS.

Illustrator Chris Lyons created the artwork under the direction of Antonio Alcalá.

 

Here’s additional background:

 

In 2016, the U.S. Postal Service® celebrates pickup trucks, the rugged and reliable work vehicles that Americans have driven for nearly a century. The stamps feature four iconic models: the 1938 International Harvester D-2, the 1948 Ford F-1, the 1953 Chevrolet, and the 1965 Ford F-100.

The origin of pickup trucks can be traced back to the early 20th century, when automobiles first became popular in the United States. They made personally hauling cargo, which once was the job of horse-drawn wagons, easier than ever. By the early 1900s, several manufacturers first began producing light-duty trucks in limited numbers.

International Harvester supplied and maintained trucks on stateside military bases during World War I. In 1917, Ford released the Model TT, which had a one-ton chassis. For 1918, Chevrolet introduced the Model 490 truck. But because drivers had to purchase their own cargo beds and bodies, these vehicles weren’t considered true pickup trucks.

The first fully factory assembled pickup truck didn’t arrive until the middle of the next decade, when the 1925 Ford Model T Runabout with Pick-Up Body made its debut. A fortified version of Ford’s landmark Model T, it had a base price of $281, featured a steel bed, and was powered by a modest 20-horsepower engine. Ford sold nearly 34,000 Model T pickups, helping kick start the popularity of pickup trucks.

Automaker Studebaker used the word “pickup” in an advertisement in 1913, but the exact root of the term “pickup” is unclear. By the Great Depression, it had become part of the American lexicon. U.S. Federal Regulations currently classify the pickup truck as “a non-passenger automobile which has a passenger compartment and an open cargo area (bed).”

Known for its production of agricultural equipment, International Harvester also made acclaimed light-duty trucks. In the 1930s, the company introduced its D line of pickups. With its six-cylinder engine and half-ton payload capacity, the 1938 International Harvester D-2 was a strong, sturdy pickup. The model was also visually striking. It had a distinct barrel-shaped grille and its elegant styling mirrored the look of luxury automobiles of the era.

By the end of World War II, pickups had become ubiquitous, especially in rural America. The nation’s major manufacturers soon began designing well-equipped trucks that no longer resembled the bare-bones models they once offered.

In 1947, Chevrolet rolled out the Advance-Design Series, the first all-new post-World War II pickup truck line. The new Chevys were roomier and more powerful than ever before. Advance-Design pickups, such as the 1953 Chevrolet, featured large windshields that provided drivers with excellent visibility, a distinctive curvy grille that bulged in the middle, and a six-cylinder engine. Advance-Design trucks were America’s top-selling pickups for nearly a decade.

The same year Chevy debuted its new line, International Harvester introduced its KB-Series of trucks. During World War II thousands of soldiers drove IH trucks, and once back home, welcomed the chance to own a stylish KB-1, -2 or -3 pickup.

Ford’s F-Series also differed greatly from relatively sparse models previously available. Also known as the “Bonus Built” line, F-Series trucks were, in the words of Ford’s famous advertising campaign, “built stronger to last longer.” Ford launched the new line with the 1948 Ford F-1. It included features like the roomy “Million Dollar Cab,” a sharp horizontal five-bar grille, and a six- or eight-cylinder engine. Ford sold more than 300,000 trucks in the first model year of the F-Series.

In the 1960s and 1970s, International Harvester’s line of light trucks flourished. In addition to the pickup version of the popular Scout, the company offered the C-Series, including the C-110. Most IH pickups of the era were available in a number of different wheelbases, a variety of engines, and with a larger, “Bonus-Load” bed. These models also offered a crew cab option, a popular concept introduced by IH in 1957.

For the 1965 model year, the F-Series pickup got a facelift. The 1965 Ford F-100 had a new grille that featured 18 small rectangular openings. It also featured what Ford dubbed “Twin-I-Beam” independent front suspension, which improved the quality of the ride, and a powerful six- or eight-cylinder engine. The F-Series is still in production today and remains the country’s top-selling truck line. As of 2015, there have been 13 generations of F-Series pickups.

Pickup Trucks is being issued as a First-Class Mail Forever booklet of 20 stamps. These Forever stamps will always be equal in value to the current First-Class Mail one-ounce price.

About Jefferson Bryant (221 Articles)
A life-long gearhead, Street Tech Magazine founder and editor Jefferson Bryant spends more time in the shop than anywhere else. His career began in the car audio industry as a shop manager, eventually working his way into a position at Rockford Fosgate as a product designer. In 2003, he began writing tech articles for magazines, and has been working as an automotive journalist ever since. His work has been featured in Car Craft, Hot Rod, Rod & Custom, Truckin’, Mopar Muscle, and many more. Jefferson has also written 5 books and produced countless videos. Jefferson operates Red Dirt Rodz, his personal garage studio, where all of his magazine articles and tech videos are produced. You can follow Jefferson on Facebook (Jefferson Bryant), Twitter (71Buickfreak), and YouTube (RedDirtRodz).

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